OR-224 closure update – Spring/Summer 2021



Recovery work from the devastating Riverside Fire in Clackamas County will require the continued closure of Highway 224 east of Estacada through at least the fall of 2021.


The Labor Day 2020 fire burned extremely hot along the approximate 20 mile stretch of this wild and scenic area of the Clackamas River, destroying tens of thousands of trees in its path. The hazard trees, most of which are perched high above the roadway on steep cliffs, along with falling rocks, make the corridor unsafe for public access.


In addition to the tree and rock hazards presented to both work crews and the public, the roadway itself and the safety infrastructure were significantly damaged and must be repaired. All public access recreation areas in the corridor are also closed.


“When the fire came through this area, it burned at a very high intensity, resulting in thousands of dead or dying trees that now pose a major threat to public safety,” explained Acting Clackamas River District Ranger Rachel LaMedica. “It also caused extensive damage to our campgrounds and recreation areas along the Highway 224 corridor, which we will not be able to reopen this summer.”

“Our intent is not to keep this corridor closed,” assured On-Scene Incident Commander Jose Villapalando. “It’s to make sure that when we do open this highway up, we’re giving the public a safe corridor they can come back to and safely use the resources they have come to enjoy throughout the years.”

Highway 224 is closed between mileposts 31.2 (east of Promontory Park) and 49.8. We strongly recommend visiting TripCheck for the latest traffic delay updates statewide and using alternate routes to avoid fire corridors.


Wildfire waste and debris removal

The State of Oregon is working with federal, state and local partners to remove hazardous waste, and ash and debris from the 2020 Oregon wildfires safely, efficiently, and as quickly as possible. The Oregon Departments of Transportation, Environmental Quality and Emergency Management are leading the effort, with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency assistance.